1. Hello guest! Are you an Apistogramma enthusiast? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's a great place for Apisto enthusiasts to meet online. Once you join you'll be able to post messages, upload pictures of your fish and tanks and have a great time with other Apisto enthusiasts. Sign up today!

RAMIREZI - Sex differences

Discussion in 'Identification and Morphology' started by MDAD, Dec 27, 2016.

  1. MDAD

    MDAD New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hey ppl!

    I have two gold rams with me. I read the female has that purple patch on the belly and the male doesnt.

    These purple patch only appears when the female is sexually mature or a female always have this purple patch during her life?

    Im asking that because one of my gold rams is slightly round shaped and the other one is not so rounded, but no purple patch. BTW, i visited many lfs here and i cant find any rams with a female purple patch. Well, is it not happening because are they still young?

    Thanks in advance.
  2. gerald

    gerald Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,485
    Likes Received:
    640
    Trophy Points:
    113
    No, the purple patch is not always there; it can come and go according to age and conditions. Some males can get a little purple too, but usually less than females do. The golds and electric blue rams are more difficult to sex than normal blue rams. Look at a combination of indicators: forehead shape (more square in males), belly shape, dorsal and anal fin length, and purple on belly. On normal blue rams, you can also use the pattern of blue iridescent spots on the black lateral spot.
    dw1305 likes this.
  3. MDAD

    MDAD New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Thank you :)
  4. MDAD

    MDAD New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Well..i did a research online about characteristics of female and male and all pointed to two females. But its not. Its a couple, they spawned, and the kids are grouped inside a pit in the sand. More few days they will do a lift off.

    Two questions...the parents moved the eggs from different places by 5 times or more. Are they getting scared to do that?

    After the babies are swiming how many times per day i should feed with microworms? Cooked egg yolk can be used too?

    Thx in advance.
  5. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Messages:
    9,848
    Likes Received:
    1,345
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Moving larvae/wigglers is not uncommon for Rams. In the wild many substrate spawners do this to prevent them from being found by predators. You are now at the time when most ram fry are eaten by the parents for some reason. If/when the fry become freeswimming it is best to feed them with live micro-organisms like paramecium or cyclops. Microworms are even too large for the first few days. Many breeder keep a large clump of Jungle Moss, which houses large amounts of micro-organisms, in the tank. Sponge filters also contain large amounts of micro-organisms and some hobbyists squeeze 'mulm' from them for the fry.
    dw1305 likes this.
  6. MDAD

    MDAD New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    I just have two corys schwartzii here...and the rams are kicking them away lol... Ill try to squeeze the mulm from another healthy fishtank i have here...thanks for your advice.. Btw...and about cooked egg yolk? I think to create infusioriae it would take some time to do so..and im not so safe to make a lettuce to rot and use this water into the tank...
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
  7. dw1305

    dw1305 Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2008
    Messages:
    2,156
    Likes Received:
    546
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Hi all,
    I like the <"moss method"> as well.
    You get a lot of <"rotifers"> in filter sponges, and <"rotifers are great fry food">. You squeeze the mulm out over the moss for maximum benefit.

    Once you get the fry past the first few days you can pipette a slurry of micro-worms and powdered dried food into the moss. The wriggle of the worms stimulates the fry feeding response and hopefully they will try the powdered food as well.
    I like dead leaves in the tank, they definitely help to produce small food items, without the same risk of water contamination.

    Have a look at <"All the leaves are brown">.

    cheers Darrel
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
    ButtNekkid likes this.