• Hello guest! Are you an Apistogramma enthusiast? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's a great place for Apisto enthusiasts to meet online. Once you join you'll be able to post messages, upload pictures of your fish and tanks and have a great time with other Apisto enthusiasts. Sign up today!

Water conditions/temperature preferences for various species of Apistogramma?

Messages
37
So, this is a very broad question and one that I'm sure someone will give me grief for even asking...but...

I ran across the map for type localities of various Apistogramma species (I think someone in here steered me toward it a while back, but can't be sure). Anyway, I recently ran across a thread on a different forum where a guy was talking about how you could tell the temperature preferences for certain species based on the distribution of/collection localities of that given species. This makes sense, biologically/ecologically, as fish found in different environments/microenvironments will prefer different temperatures (thinking of different darter species here in the eastern US). I also know that the Amazon and associated drainages is a huge area. So my question is, does anyone in here know if that information is available in an easy to find location, in one place? Or would it just require research into each individual location/species to find out?

I also know that most seem to be pretty happy with temperatures in the range of roughly 73-76 or 78 Fahrenheit (22-25 Celsius, roughly), but to those that have bred significantly more Apistogramma than I have, is it as important to keep those that live in cooler environments at a lower temperature and those that live in warmer environments at a warmer temperature to get the best breeding results? Or is it possible that I'm thinking about this factor way too much? I know that some sex ratios are temperature dependent, but that aside, I'm curious about just breeding/survival.

I feel like most breeders I hear from say that they just generally keep they're tanks at 76 or 78 (24-25 Celsius, roughly) constantly, but in some areas, there are temperatures swings and some species live in temperatures lower than this in the wild.

Looking for information/responses from those of you that have bred a lot of different Apistogramma species here. Your help/advice/information is greatly appreciated!

Again, I'm just trying to learn as much as I can, and sometimes I go down paths that ask these sort of random questions. Apologies!
 

Mike Wise

Moderator
Staff member
5 Year Member
Messages
11,303
Location
Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
See: U. Römer, W. Beisenherz. 1996. Environmental determination of sex in Apistogrammai (Cichlidae) and two other freshwater fishes (Teleostei). J. Fish Biol. 48(4): 714-725.

Also note that water temps vary with depth and overhead cover. Römer found that the more dominant females seek out optimal breeding temperatures and force subdominant females into cooler or warmer temperatures.
 
Messages
37
See: U. Römer, W. Beisenherz. 1996. Environmental determination of sex in Apistogrammai (Cichlidae) and two other freshwater fishes (Teleostei). J. Fish Biol. 48(4): 714-725.

Also note that water temps vary with depth and overhead cover. Römer found that the more dominant females seek out optimal breeding temperatures and force subdominant females into cooler or warmer temperatures.
Interesting...I haven't read this yet, but based on this statement, it does seem that maybe I should try and better match the temperatures from which particular species come!

Thank you for replying!
 
Messages
37

Knock yourself out.
Badass!!! Thanks! This is helpful! I was able to find some averages of temps for some of the larger rivers online in real-time, some of which seem to contradict this a bit…but this link is extremely helpful!

Thanks again!
 

MacZ

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,186
Location
Germany
My pleasure. The main focus of the two maps is pH and conductivity, but most locations also give temperatures. Also look closely at the dates. Dry and rainy season temperatures fluctuate the further away you are from the Equator.
 

Mike Wise

Moderator
Staff member
5 Year Member
Messages
11,303
Location
Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
Make sure these are water temperature and not the air temperature. It also is helpful to know at what depth the water temperature was measured and the season, as MacZ wrote. Most temperatures are measured during the dry season when water is slightly warmer. Also water temperature will vary after a rainfall.
 

anewbie

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,477
Make sure these are water temperature and not the air temperature. It also is helpful to know at what depth the water temperature was measured and the season, as MacZ wrote. Most temperatures are measured during the dry season when water is slightly warmer. Also water temperature will vary after a rainfall.
Do the fishes tend to breed during wet or dry seasons ?
 

MacZ

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,186
Location
Germany
Do the fishes tend to breed during wet or dry seasons ?
Looking at the intermediate periods is most interesting. Many (catfish, cichlidss, most tetras) tend to time breeding season with wet season. Some toss that and breed at the end of wet season, having fatted up to produce eggs that wait in the substrate for the next wet season to then hatch. Killifish are an example.
And then there are the ones without a breeding season like most livebearers. They breed as long as there is water, because their young are highly adaptable and their strategy is to adapt to conditions asap.
 
Messages
37
I've only collected during the dry season. I've seen larger cichlid species brooding fry. As for apistos, well, our seines did not capture such small fish, but did collect females in brood dress.
Thank you all for this information/discussion. Again, not sure if it'll really make that large a difference, but worth a try. I feel that as long as I get a general "preferable" or "natural" range for each species that I'm keeping, I should do okay. I've had the three species I keep currently breed at 73-76 degrees (22 - 24.5 Celsius, roughly), with my cacatuoides breeding regularly at the higher end, so maybe I'm overthinking it. I do know, when talking about breeding native fishes to the southeastern US (thinking darters and sunfish), some only breed during the spring when temperatures raise and hit a certain range.

Again, I'm just trying to learn as much about this genus as I can and succesfully keep, breed, and raise fry from them. I actually hated cichlids until I got into the South American dwarfs (Rams first, then Apistogramma). Just wanna learn!

Thanks again! You guys are super helpful!

Tony
 

Members online

Latest posts

Forum statistics

Threads
18,063
Messages
117,511
Members
13,146
Latest member
Sr. A

Latest profile posts

jloponte wrote on hongyj's profile.
Please send me info regarding cuipeua. Thx, Joe.
jloponte wrote on hongyj's profile.
Where are you located?
Josh wrote on anewbie's profile.
Testing
EDO
Longtime fish enthusiast for over 70years......keen on Apistos now. How do I post videos?
Looking for some help with fighting electric blue rams :(
Top