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The Artificially Hatch Plan & Heist!

Borelliiguy

Member
Ok So My apisto inka has just consumed her 11th spawn and I have decided that when she spawns next I'm taking them out on day 1. As to why she does this I'm not sure but my theory is that she likes to pretend she is brooding so she can boss the male about because she carries herself aggressively towards the male in full canary aggressive dress for several days/ a week after the slaughter until he finds out/confirms she has no fry. But that's just a theory. Some stats and equipment and my plans for the fry...

.33 US gal bb Fry tank.
.Methylene blue 1-2 drops per gal (50 drops total) during incubation
.Ocean nutrition Instant baby brine to feed
.Accurate temp match via and lcd thermometer (same brand and make) on both tanks so I can just pull and drop the eggs
.Alder cones and Almond leaves (although I'm not sure if I should add these with the meth blue?)

She lays the eggs in a vase and I'm not sure how to best provide a good source of oxygen as I know most use an airstone. My plan is to use a internal filter directed at the vase opening but placed at the opposite end of the tanks? In short I'm determined to have some inka fry because I love raising them. Any tips and suggestions greatly appreciated her!

Oh I should mention that the inka pair are in a heavily planted 55gal the only other occupants are a school of 9 small rasboras and they wont even come to the lower levels to feed let alone dare challenge the aggressive female for aquarium real estate.
 

Josh

Administrator
Staff member
5 Year Member
What a pain in the arse she is! It looks like your plan should work on paper. The tricky part will be getting just the right amount of flow over those eggs to keep them oxygenated and 'fresh'
 

Ttw

Active Member
5 Year Member
Had similar problems with my barlowi so I artificially hatched her eggs multiple times. I placed the small flower pot in which she laid her eggs into a plastic specimen container that hung inside the aquarium. That kept the temps equal. I put enough methylene blue into the container water until I could barely see the flower pot. Eggs fungused at more dilute methylene blue concentrations. I placed a rigid air tube next to the pot and bubbled air to circulate the water. This method worked for me.
 

Borelliiguy

Member
Ok so today was the day. I haven't artificially hatched eggs before so I'm going to give you a play by play so to speak.

>Temp matched both aquariums before removing eggs
>Added 66 drops of methylene blue/ 2 drops per gal (please let me know if this is two much)

I do not have an air stone so I have an internal filter flow directed at the opening of the vase. Pic below.
 

Borelliiguy

Member
Guys I really need a few pointers here since this is my first attempt at this.

Should I change the methylene blue water once they have hatched?

The filter is quite strong should I switch it off on the 4th/5th days during hatching?
 

regani

Active Member
5 Year Member
Sorry, can't help much as I have never tried to hatch them artificially before. A strong current would be a bit of a concern for me though, as the freshly hatched fry are quite weak and not very mobile for the first few days. Otherwise your guesses are as good as mine...
 

sasikan

Member
i sometimes add methylene blue to angels eggs and i start making water changes as soon as they hatch ,i start with 25% (i usually take the water from the parents tank) ps can you still find methylene blue in stores in the U. S. ? they dont sell it in canada now!
 

Apistomaster

Member
5 Year Member
I begin to make partial water changes as soon as the eggs have hatched.
I use however much methylene blue as needed to stain the water enough to where visibility is barely possible.
Since there are a variety of solution strengths on the market it is hard to prescribe the exact amount you need to use but dark is good and methylene blue has a wide safety margin.
 

Ttw

Active Member
5 Year Member
I begin to make partial water changes as soon as the eggs have hatched.
I use however much methylene blue as needed to stain the water enough to where visibility is barely possible.
Since there are a variety of solution strengths on the market it is hard to prescribe the exact amount you need to use but dark is good and methylene blue has a wide safety margin.
I have done this the same way. Add the methylene blue until there is little visibility and partial water changes once the eggs hatch. I don't think you need a lot of water movement. An air stone isn't needed just some airline tubing and some gentle bubbling.
 

Borelliiguy

Member
PIC UPDATE

Ok guys so the meth blue attempt failed. No eggs hatched and I feel as though the current killed the eggs or perhaps I overdosed the tank. Anyways today, The female has laid a fresh batch and I've taken them out. The stats

.35L tank
.Tank water instead of fresh from the tap
.Crushed Catappa leaves, boiled and then cooled added to the tank.

Pics:



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The tank is much darker than it appears. The flow is much more gentler but I'm unsure if I should keep the coconut shell turned upwards or facing down. This part is a sticking point so if you read this please take a moment to reply in regards to the placement of the shell.
 
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