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Shell dwellers

Mongbean

Member
Hey guys I am wanting to add some Neolamprologus Brevis to my tank and have it stocked with peacocks.

I have done a mountain of research but have not seen anything as to why I can't put them together?

Any feed back around this would be great.
 

slimbolen99

Active Member
5 Year Member
You probably haven't seen much because they are from two different lakes; the peacocks from Lake Malawi, and the shellies from Lake Tanganyika. Personally, I don't think it would be too much of a problem. Just make sure you leave some open sandy areas with no shells.

Now, if you were going to put in mbuna and shellies, that would be something I could see being a problem, aggression wise.
 

Mongbean

Member
Lol i know they are from different lakes.
I just want to make sure my peacocks don't look at them as food.
 

Hague1982

New Member
To be honest this is one of my pet hates. I don't agree with mixing both lakes, what Mikes say's is spot on. I've never kept shellies in a community tank other than when I first started keeping fish and then I quickly learnt. I've had Neolamprologus brevis Kigoma and they where truely stunning by far the best shellie I've ever kept apart from Kungweensis. I never quite took to multifasciatus I always had trouble with them.

 

Mongbean

Member
Other than temperament though there is no real reason why they can't be kept together.
They share the same water chemistry.
There is no chance they will mate.
The only issue is if they will get eaten.
But with peacocks around the 10cm Mark it will be no issue.

I have now crossed referanced this information and again it comes back to temperament.
 

Hague1982

New Member
Other than temperament though there is no real reason why they can't be kept together.
They share the same water chemistry.
There is no chance they will mate.
The only issue is if they will get eaten.
But with peacocks around the 10cm Mark it will be no issue.

I have now crossed referanced this information and again it comes back to temperament.
Maybe I'm just a traditionalist when it comes to keeping Tanganyikan cichlids but I wouldn't do it. People do don't get me wrong, I just don't like it. And they only share the same water chemistry in the aquarium.

The two lake are actually very different in many ways. Despite popular opinion the water of Lake Malawi isn't really all that hard.
  • GH - 4 to 6.
  • KH - 6 to 8.
  • pH - 7.8 to 8.6
  • Conductivity - 210 - 220.
  • Temp - 72 to 82F.
The water found in Lake Tanganyika on the other hand is very different.
  • GH - 11 to 17.
  • KH - 16 to 19.
  • pH - 8.6 to 9.5.
  • Conductivity - 606 - 620.
  • Temp - 76 to 82F.
So with the fish coming from different water chemistries and requiring very different maintenance and care it generally isn't a good idea to mix the two in the same aquarium.

Cheers by the way I loved those Fish :)
 

Mongbean

Member
That's some solid information, thank you!

I will throw another question to you if you don't mind.
If the lakes are different and F1 fish taken from them are bred in aquriums and the fish I have is by nature the same breed but is so far from the original as it's tolerant to a wider water chemistry then the F1. Would then mixing them be ok? or would it be still a moral thing on your behalf.

As you can see I really want them in my tank and like you I love them as well.
I have two peacocks currently as they were about to be flushed and I put a stop to it and I was planning on creating a cichlid tank anyway. Getting these fish has just jolted me into making it happen.

I have spoken to a few people that have them together and said they were fine but I am not shelling (mind the pun) good money out to watch them become snacks for the peacocks or live in a stressful environment.
I think I may have to find a home for the peacocks and look for other suitable fish that will go with the shelleys.
 

Hague1982

New Member
I just don't agree with it and don't really like it that's all. Your welcome to do it in your aquariums, If that's what you want.
 

gerald

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Letting the shellies get established first in the tank and then adding the peacocks might be a safer way to do it, so the peacocks aren't tempted to chase the new intruders, and so the little guys wont be as likely to flee and act like prey.
 

Hague1982

New Member
Letting the shellies get established first in the tank and then adding the peacocks might be a safer way to do it, so the peacocks aren't tempted to chase the new intruders, and so the little guys wont be as likely to flee and act like prey.
I've done it that way with Altolamprologus compressiceps and shellies and ended up with no shellies. Everybody has different expierence so I'd encourage you to try it and see if it works for you.
 

Cooder

Member
I agree with Hague1982... shelldwellers dont like horribly active competing fish stressing them out, especially brevis. Brevis are hard enough to induce to spawn in a species tank with a few dithers, let alone with peacocks... Brevis are a nice fish, but they are terribly boring without spawning
I WOULDNT encourage it... if you want shelldwellers with your malawians get the species of dwarf mbuna that shelldwell.

Why do you want shellies with peacocks anyway? shelldwellers are more loved for their behaviour and personalities than colour, and putting them with others fish that are not compatible would destroy the effect,

Peacocks would take the eye of anyone passing the tank, why have little brown fish in with them that would just feel stressed and not want to come out of their shells?

My 2 bucks....
 

Mongbean

Member
That's the point of all this research i guess.
i no longer have the peacocks.
Were far to aggressive for my liking...
I have four brevis on order from a local breeder and i'm currently compiling a stock list that they would be happy to be with.
I want the brevis for their personality not their colour.
 

Cooder

Member
maybe a julidochromis transcriptus or ornatus pair, they go quite well with shelldwellers.

I dont know how cyprichromis species would go in your tank. I guess a school of about 8 - 10 would be alright, as they could would use more of the depth in the tank than normal, usually they use the length more.

Put some pics up when your ready! this should be an interesting setup, ive never seen a shelly/cyp/julie setup in a 200 litre cube.
 

Mongbean

Member
Thank you for your suggestions.
The julidochromis transcriptus are a great looking fish!
I can see why you chose cyprichromis. They seem to offer great harmony with in the tank by hanging around the top half.
This will give a breather to the bevis.

As for the brevis Each pair will be positioned on opposite corners of the cube with a centre pillar of lava rock that will rise like a tower in the centre.
Considering their territories range i would not be surprised if they never see each other.
 
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