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Male Agassizii has gone very shy.

Ambidextrous

New Member
Hi all.
I have introduced myself in the correct section but just in case you don't see it, I'm Steve. :)

I'm very pleased to have found this forum as I'm concerned about one of my males. I have two pairs of A. Agassizii and they couldn't be more different in their temperament. In my main tank (600 litre) I have mainly Rainbowfish and the Agassizii in there are very bold, they spend a lot of time together but the female is always very dark and neither of them seem interested in breeding at all. I'm absolutely fine with that, I bought them as I like them not to breed them. They are both very healthy and eat well. The male is so happy and confident I literally have to hoover around him when it's maintenance day and he swims in the bubbles enjoying himself when I refill the tank after a water change.

My upstairs tank (100 litre) has the second pair and ten Lemon Tetra as dithers. They were in a smaller tank until about two weeks ago when I bought the current tank for them so they had a little more room and some extra plants, wood and hiding places. They did try and spawn twice in the smaller tank but the eggs stayed white. Not sure if it's due to the PH being a little high or an infertile fish??? Anyway, I'm waffling.... The female is her usual self and has been since three days after moving. She's eating, coming to the front of the tank to greet me, and seems completely happy. The male hides behind a rock or in a cave and stays there. I have only seen him eat once and I'm very concerned about him. They were acclimated properly when moving and as with all my fish, were treated with kid gloves.

For reference, both pairs are almost full grown and show good colour. Food is a mixture of bug bites, pellets, frozen and live food.
Both pairs were bred by my local LFS in water exactly the same parameters as my own.
The only issue I've had before is the female in the small tank had a slightly cloudy eye when I first bought her. It was treated and cleared in a couple of days. No issues since.

Thanks for any help or advice.
 

Ambidextrous

New Member
I've never noticed before but the male in question seems to have a very slight arch to his shape and a slightly puffy belly. (Arched as in the centre of his back is the highest point) I'm trying to research to see if there's an issue of some kind.
 

Mike Wise

Moderator
Staff member
5 Year Member
I think it is time to place him in a quarantine tank. Arched backs usually indicate an old fish or one with a nutritional deficiency. A puffy belly commonly indicates an internal infection or parasites.
 

Ambidextrous

New Member
Thanks Mike Wise. His back isn't curved like a boomerang but it is noticeable. He's always had a little bit of a pot belly but he always seemed happy and was eating well. I don't have a quarantine tank set up right now but it wouldn't take me 5 minutes to move the lemon tetra and the female into my main tank and medicate the male on his own.
What would you suggest medicine wise? I currently have API aquarium salt, eSHa 2000 and Melafix. I'm happy to buy whatever I need.
Thanks again.
 

Mike Wise

Moderator
Staff member
5 Year Member
A quarantine tank can be as simple as a large shoe box with a sponge filter and heater. I cannot help you with medications. I do not medicate unless I am rather sure of the problem. Otherwise I just feed quality food, make sure the water quality is excellent, let the fish's immune system do its best - and often pray (cannot hurt).
 

Ambidextrous

New Member
Hi Mike.
I finally mustered enough courage to do a large water change and pull the cave out of the tank to see what was up with him. Unfortunately he looked rather frail and his rear end was full of Callamanus. That must have happened so quickly, poor little thing. I've never seen or had it in any of my tanks before.
Being an old fish in such poor condition I did the deed (I felt awful) and he's not suffering any more. His rear end looked terrible, worse than most of the images I found online. I just hope it hasn't spread to the other fish.
At least I know before this happened he was pampered with good food, excellent water quality and a beautiful tank to live in. All the more annoying that this happened.
Thanks again for all the help Mike. Much appreciated.
 

Mike Wise

Moderator
Staff member
5 Year Member
Since camallanus easily spreads in an aquarium please keep an eye out for other fish with signs of it. There are treatments; do a search here and on the web.
 
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