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I. Adoketa

rasmusW

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Messages
489
Hi all!

I got a few questions about dither fish for I. Adoketa.
I have read some threads here, stating that they would eat all “bite sized” tank mates if they can catch them.
Do you think n. Marginatus would fall into that category?
I guess n. Eques is too big?

Also, would any of the two be considered natural congers?

I’m asking because my female atahualpa died and i have moved the male to one of my other tanks, so i’m looking for something else for the large tank.

Thanks in advance.

-r
 

MacZ

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,187
Location
Germany
A fully grown I. adoteka might snack on a N. marginatus. N. eques might in fact be just too slow evading the cichlid but they would be safe from predation.
 

rasmusW

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Messages
489
Thanks MacZ. Ye! Sadly what i thought myself. Just wanted confirmation.
Well, guess i will have to think of bigger or no other fish if i end up getting adoketas.

-r
 

Tom C

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Messages
587
Location
Norway
Rio Cuiari, Eastern Colombia, December 2018:

Ivanacara adoketa, both big ones:

resizeimage.aspx


and smaller ones:
resizeimage.aspx


Other fishes found in the habitat:

resizeimage.aspx

resizeimage.aspx

resizeimage.aspx


and Copella:

resizeimage.aspx


Because they lived in the same waters , I tried some Copella eigenmanni together with a pair of I. adoketa from the Río Cuiari, here. But as the Copellas very soon started to disappear one by one, I removed the remaining ones.

I keep, and have kept and bred I. adoketa for many (18) years. In my experience there are few fishes too big to be taken by them. They sometimes tear each other's jaws apart, fight to they die, and they bite off the entire tail or dorsal fin of larger fish. You know who they're named after, right?

There was once a report from a stream on the Rio Negro where it was observed that the tiny 2-3 cm long tetra Tucanoichthys tucano fearlessly chased large I. adoketa away from its territory. I tried this combination in a 132 liter tank, and could observe that the small tetras definitely did not hide from the large cichlids. But I noticed the way the cichlids looked at the tetras, and dared not do anything but rescue the tetras safely after 3 days.
In my opinion, I. adoketa should not be kept with other fish at all, unless you have a bull shark or something similar...

However: They are superinteresting and very beautiful fishes. The way a pair move around each other, chase each other, follow each other, tease each other and hide or pretend to attack the other one, before they initiate spawning, is an absolutely wonderful sight!
 

rasmusW

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Messages
489
Thanks Tom, for stopping by. It’s always great to hear of your travels.
I am still thinking this whole thing through. I hope to go to the shop this weekend, so i can see them in real life.

I keep, and have kept and bred I. adoketa for many (18) years. In my experience there are few fishes too big to be taken by them. They sometimes tear each other's jaws apart, fight to they die, and they bite off the entire tail or dorsal fin of larger fish. You know who they're named after, right?
hehe.. they sure sounds like small beasts..
No, i actually don’t know for sure but now that i think of it, Ivan the terrible?

One thing i’m sure of is they look beautiful.
-and sound a bit terrifying.

-r
 

ivantheterrible

New Member
Messages
4
Rio Cuiari, Eastern Colombia, December 2018:

Ivanacara adoketa, both big ones:

resizeimage.aspx


and smaller ones:
resizeimage.aspx


Other fishes found in the habitat:

resizeimage.aspx

resizeimage.aspx

resizeimage.aspx


and Copella:

resizeimage.aspx


Because they lived in the same waters , I tried some Copella eigenmanni together with a pair of I. adoketa from the Río Cuiari, here. But as the Copellas very soon started to disappear one by one, I removed the remaining ones.

I keep, and have kept and bred I. adoketa for many (18) years. In my experience there are few fishes too big to be taken by them. They sometimes tear each other's jaws apart, fight to they die, and they bite off the entire tail or dorsal fin of larger fish. You know who they're named after, right?

There was once a report from a stream on the Rio Negro where it was observed that the tiny 2-3 cm long tetra Tucanoichthys tucano fearlessly chased large I. adoketa away from its territory. I tried this combination in a 132 liter tank, and could observe that the small tetras definitely did not hide from the large cichlids. But I noticed the way the cichlids looked at the tetras, and dared not do anything but rescue the tetras safely after 3 days.
In my opinion, I. adoketa should not be kept with other fish at all, unless you have a bull shark or something similar...

However: They are superinteresting and very beautiful fishes. The way a pair move around each other, chase each other, follow each other, tease each other and hide or pretend to attack the other one, before they initiate spawning, is an absolutely wonderful sight!
Do you think they'd do well in a colony in a larger tank? 40-75 gallon
 

MacZ

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,187
Location
Germany
Do you think they'd do well in a colony in a larger tank? 40-75 gallon
Tom is one of the most experienced people on here. If he says this:
I keep, and have kept and bred I. adoketa for many (18) years. In my experience there are few fishes too big to be taken by them. They sometimes tear each other's jaws apart, fight to they die, and they bite off the entire tail or dorsal fin of larger fish. You know who they're named after, right?
What do you think what the answer to your question might be?

I'd not recommend group keeping and to have a running tank at hand to separate them at any given time if necessary.
 

rasmusW

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Messages
489
Hi all!

I still haven’t decided on which cichlid, i want go for but i did get some beautiful copella nattereri.
They have been i my tank around a week and i have already seen the first few clutches of eggs and witnessed mass-breeding with up to 5 fish involved.
Last i had them i only saw two at a time.

Here’s a few pictures. Sorry for the crappy quality.
3EDE31CF-EEB6-44BF-81C8-9D5A8A8DF477.jpeg
28B82125-D4F8-4308-A042-9F6679A46D80.jpeg
1BAB714B-9929-4A49-827B-3786A2B46B9B.jpeg
8610F35B-EB67-4651-A166-ED1ED5B933BC.jpeg


-r
 

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