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Apistogramma Agassizii Fire Gold Breeding

Bæn

New Member
Messages
5
I have a 15 gallon tank 60cmx30cmx30cm tank, which currently has convict cichlid fry growing, they are nearly grown enough to sell off. I was researching fish to buy and decided i like the Apistogramma Agassizii Fire Gold. I found an ad for a pair for 110 AUD. is the tank big enough for this pair and would it at all be possible to keep any tank mates for example i really like the blue king cochus tetra, as well as possibly some shrimp and snails, is this possible?. Let me know and any tips for breeding would be welcomed. Also wondering if it would improve the likelyhood of breeding if i bought a black water tea bag thing which im guessing would simulate their natural environment. Thanks

PS my ph is around 7 and my water is soft
Screenshot 2023-09-24 at 8.47.35 am.png
 

Bob Dixon

New Member
Messages
9
That's big enough for a trio if you give them some landscaping to break line of sight, but yes, sure.
 

John Hardisty

New Member
Messages
1
I have a 15 gallon tank 60cmx30cmx30cm tank, which currently has convict cichlid fry growing, they are nearly grown enough to sell off. I was researching fish to buy and decided i like the Apistogramma Agassizii Fire Gold. I found an ad for a pair for 110 AUD. is the tank big enough for this pair and would it at all be possible to keep any tank mates for example i really like the blue king cochus tetra, as well as possibly some shrimp and snails, is this possible?. Let me know and any tips for breeding would be welcomed. Also wondering if it would improve the likelyhood of breeding if i bought a black water tea bag thing which im guessing would simulate their natural environment. Thanks

PS my ph is around 7 and my water is soft
View attachment 13561
Tank size is good adding quick moving dither fish is a good idea too, something like danios maybe. It will make the apisto's feel safer but the apisto's will hunt them away while sporning and when fry have hatched. Shrimp are not a good idea the apisto's will eat shrimplets and can mess with the adults even pulling their legs off. I had to remove my mystery snail from my apisto's tank as they were nipping at the snails antenna. So I'd say no to snails to be on the safe side. All in all not good news but better to be forwarned. Hope this helps.
 

Mike Wise

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Staff member
5 Year Member
Messages
11,162
Location
Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
Tank size is good adding quick moving dither fish is a good idea too, something like danios maybe.
"Quick moving dither fish" is a bad idea, particularly manic species like danios. They tend to disturb apistos and many eat apisto fry. Go with recommended species mentioned here. The fish you are interested in are more commonly called Fire-red Agassizii. You'll find more information under this name. Tank size is just adequate if properly decorated.
 

anewbie

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,332
I think 15 gallons is too small for this species. I have my D50 in a 29 and they are quasi pair forming and I think the 29 is too small for them; they much prefer the 40 they used to be in.
 

MacZ

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,892
Location
Germany
1695630876522.png

Don't want to be a buzzkill here, but using the picture from that retailer website as an avatar is a copyright problem. We take picture copyrights serious here. (ask TomC)

On the topic:
I agree with anewbie. The tank size is ok for A. borellii or Apistogrammoides pucallpaensis, but not for A. agassizii. Especially not for the domestic form which tends to be bigger and a bit more agressive than the wild ones. And as Mike said, just adequate if done properly, not optimal.
is the tank big enough for this pair
A. agassizii are also not pair-forming. The male will only tolerate the female while she is ready to spawn and it is likely (not guaranteed but very likely) the female will not tolerate the male while brooding.
would it at all be possible to keep any tank mates for example i really like the blue king cochus tetra
Boehlkea fredcochui grow relatively big and are quite active swimmers. They should be offered a tank of 100cm length at least, preferrably 120-150cm.

I'll say it as it is: If you want a display tank, then forgo on the "pair" and only get a single male, then you can add a group of tetras. If you want to breed, get a second tank so you can separate the cichlids if needed and don't get any tankmates. But make that choice. There is no middle ground that will be satisfactory.

as well as possibly some shrimp and snails, is this possible?.
Shrimp are expensive live food. Small snails like bladder snails will come automatically with plants, bigger snail species are either not legal in Australia or require a well seasoned tank to not starve (e.g. Neritina snails).


Also wondering if it would improve the likelyhood of breeding if i bought a black water tea bag thing which im guessing would simulate their natural environment.
PS my ph is around 7 and my water is soft
A (like 1?) teabag will not do it. And what do you call soft? pH is variable and depending on KH. KH is the number that's important if you don't have a conductivity meter. For botanicals to have significant impact on the water chemistry the KH/GH should be below detection with aquarium trade typical tests or alternatively the conductivity should be below 100µS/cm.
And even then you have to add humic substances and leaf litter regularly in large quantities for months to reach a stable "as-close-as-you-can-get-in-an-aquarium" blackwater conditions.
I recommend researching water chemistry further.
 

Bæn

New Member
Messages
5
View attachment 13567
Don't want to be a buzzkill here, but using the picture from that retailer website as an avatar is a copyright problem. We take picture copyrights serious here. (ask TomC)

On the topic:
I agree with anewbie. The tank size is ok for A. borellii or Apistogrammoides pucallpaensis, but not for A. agassizii. Especially not for the domestic form which tends to be bigger and a bit more agressive than the wild ones. And as Mike said, just adequate if done properly, not optimal.

A. agassizii are also not pair-forming. The male will only tolerate the female while she is ready to spawn and it is likely (not guaranteed but very likely) the female will not tolerate the male while brooding.

Boehlkea fredcochui grow relatively big and are quite active swimmers. They should be offered a tank of 100cm length at least, preferrably 120-150cm.

I'll say it as it is: If you want a display tank, then forgo on the "pair" and only get a single male, then you can add a group of tetras. If you want to breed, get a second tank so you can separate the cichlids if needed and don't get any tankmates. But make that choice. There is no middle ground that will be satisfactory.


Shrimp are expensive live food. Small snails like bladder snails will come automatically with plants, bigger snail species are either not legal in Australia or require a well seasoned tank to not starve (e.g. Neritina snails).




A (like 1?) teabag will not do it. And what do you call soft? pH is variable and depending on KH. KH is the number that's important if you don't have a conductivity meter. For botanicals to have significant impact on the water chemistry the KH/GH should be below detection with aquarium trade typical tests or alternatively the conductivity should be below 100µS/cm.
And even then you have to add humic substances and leaf litter regularly in large quantities for months to reach a stable "as-close-as-you-can-get-in-an-aquarium" blackwater conditions.
I recommend researching water chemistry further.
About the copywrite you aren't being a buzzkill just informing me. Also with the copywrite can i use the photo for the post? or is it 100% prohibited. Thanks for the information, i didnt know and I will change it. OK so if im looking for a size to stay under would you say under 10cm. I think that i will go for a pair and attempt to breed. So if im going to have a pair that is smaller what is the need for another tank? I s it for agrression with the male after the eggs are fertilised?And if so how big of a tank? For the tea bags it comes in a pack of 10 so i was just going to add 2-3 in and i could add more if needed. Thanks for the reply
 

Bæn

New Member
Messages
5
"Quick moving dither fish" is a bad idea, particularly manic species like danios. They tend to disturb apistos and many eat apisto fry. Go with recommended species mentioned here. The fish you are interested in are more commonly called Fire-red Agassizii. You'll find more information under this name. Tank size is just adequate if properly decorated.
I agree. I think that i have to choose between display and breeding.
 

Bæn

New Member
Messages
5
After some research i have come up with my favourite pair where the male will max out around 9cm. Are these fish well sized for the tank?
 

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anewbie

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,332
Would a better size be the apistogramma agassizii tefe?
agassizii is the species; the other stuff isn't important with regards to behavior other than if it is domestic or wc. Your question is like asking if a tricolour collie behaves different than a sable collie. Both are wonderful dogs regardless of the colour of the fur.
 

Mike Wise

Moderator
Staff member
5 Year Member
Messages
11,162
Location
Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
There are actually 2 different agassizii-complex species that occur in the Rio Tefe. This is why there were so many problems with breeding/hybrids when A. sp. Tefe was first introduced.

As for A. allpahuayo, the same space requirements exist for it as the Fire-red aggies. There is little difference except A. allpahuayo is a bit more difficult to breed due to needing softer and more acidic water conditions. On another note, may I suggest that you look for something less challenging for a first apisto, possibly A. borellii Opal? It is more suited to your tank size.
 

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