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Breeding age in the wild

Discussion in 'General Dwarf Cichlids' started by mummymonkey, Sep 30, 2005.

  1. mummymonkey

    mummymonkey Member 5 Year Member

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    At what age do apistos and other dwarfs breed in the wild? I'm just being curious because I've had some very small fish spawn for me. Long before their colours and finnage are fully developed.
    If this is also typical of wild fish them I'm wondering what's the 'purpose' of the adults full battledress.
    Have there been studies done of wild dwarfs and their natural history?
  2. Greg PL

    Greg PL New Member 5 Year Member

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    I can only speculate, but it seems to me, that the females spawn whenever they are ready - if food supply is ok they can start at 3-4 months. But they will probably choose a proven partner - an adult, fully grown and good looking, capable of defending the territory from all intruders. So the younger males have less chances to procreate untill they establish their "name" in the colony.
  3. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    I know of no studies about breeding age in the wild. Since most apistos are annual fish in the wild, I imagine that they breed early, at 3 to 6 months of age & then continue onward. Once the dry season starts, it usually is only the smaller fry that survive until the next wet season - to start the cycle all over again.
  4. Cumb Dunt

    Cumb Dunt New Member 5 Year Member

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    An environment that selects for slow initial growth?

    How peculiar.
  5. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    No, one that selects for rapid maturation. Growth is secondary, but probably proceeds more rapidly than in our tanks. Fry have a constant supply of food & fresh water. Large apistos are actively preyed upon in the wild & few survive to the next season.