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Apistogramma breeding

Anon

New Member
Hey guys. So our macmasteri female laid eggs in a cave she dug out then a few days later she dug another cave and now she’s back to the first one. I don’t see any eggs but she’s still guarding it.

Any ideas on what’s going on?
 

dw1305

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Hi all,
Hey guys. So our macmasteri female laid eggs in a cave she dug out then a few days later she dug another cave and now she’s back to the first one. I don’t see any eggs but she’s still guarding it.

Any ideas on what’s going on?
Could she have fry that she is moving about?

cheers Darrel
 

rasmusW

Active Member
ye! i think darrel is right. my baenschi female does this aswell. it's quite impressive how big holes such a small fish can dig.. and quite fun to watch.

-r
 

boofeng

Member
I vaguely recall watching documentaries showing some mammal carry their cubs, still too young to walk, by the scruff of their necks one by one from one den to another. Usually it's in response to some sign of a predator being nearby or something. My memories of these are quite dim now, the only sure thing is David Attenborough's voice. :D

The apistos I've had often move the wrigglers once they hatch, even before they're free swimming. I like to think it's for similar reasons. However mine can't dig because I don't use a sand substrate - nowadays I use leaf litter over a bare bottom. It's the easiest setup to keep clean, and I'm trying my best to cut down on time spent per tank!
 
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