1. Hello guest! Are you an Apistogramma enthusiast? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's a great place for Apisto enthusiasts to meet online. Once you join you'll be able to post messages, upload pictures of your fish and tanks and have a great time with other Apisto enthusiasts. Sign up today!

Trigger happy!!!

Discussion in 'Apistogramma' started by Bunnie1978, Jun 25, 2010.

  1. Bunnie1978

    Bunnie1978 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2010
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Right side of my 29g display stocked with a wild male Apistogramma Cacatuoides and 2 domestic triple red females. Also a couple bristlenose plecos.
    [​IMG]

    Left side. I rescaped this tank last week. You can see one of the females nose sticking out in the back.
    [​IMG]

    One of the females nesting. I couldn't really see in there very well, but it doesn't look like she's spawned yet
    [​IMG]

    I had a really hard time getting great pictures of the male. He has really long fins, but not very colorful. I hope that when he breeds with the domestic females, I'll get the longer fins AND some color!
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Here are some 100% wild blood A. Cacatuoides fry!!! I've been keeping apistos for 6 months, and my first brood are wilds!!!
    [​IMG]
  2. MonteSS

    MonteSS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2010
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Very nice. GL with them.

    ...Bill
  3. aquaticclarity

    aquaticclarity Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,798
    Likes Received:
    73
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Congrats!

    I find most wild Apistos easier to work with then the tank strain fish. And the wild fish tend to have better parenting skills as an added bonus.
  4. Bunnie1978

    Bunnie1978 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2010
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks! I hope to see a spawn happen soon with my wild male/domestic female.
  5. Tom C

    Tom C Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2004
    Messages:
    493
    Likes Received:
    292
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Bunnie1978:
    Apistogramma is especially suited to look for food in fine sand. Studies on feeding methods show that all Apistogramma species exhibit “earth-eating†of sand, typical of geophagines. They take the substrate in their mouth, and after thoroughly chewing it, which is primarily accomplished by using the toothed pharyngeal plate, either spit it back out or pass it out of the mouth cavity again through the gill cover openings. Fine food particles are sifted out by the tiny denticals on the pharyngeal plate.

    [​IMG]

    With your substrate of sharp pebbles, they have no opportunity to perform this natural behavior. Too sad…. :frown:

    This is a typical habitat of Apistogramma. I collected Apistogramma sp. "Alto Tapiche" in this small jungle stream in 2009. Ground consists of very, very fine sand, with dead, brown leaves and branches on top…….

    [​IMG]

    I am convinced that your fish would be very happy if the sharp stones were replaced by fine sand .....:)
  6. Bunnie1978

    Bunnie1978 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2010
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks, Tom!!
    I guess I should go out and get more of the black diamond sand like I have in my 55. I have 3 females and one male in there, with some guppies.
  7. Hilde

    Hilde New Member 5 Year Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2009
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What are tunnels made of?
  8. Bunnie1978

    Bunnie1978 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2010
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    They are clear flexible PVC tubing. I think the 1 inch size, maybe 1 1/2. I cut them with the openning at an angle. Because they are open on both sides, females can nest.

    I actually have 3 caves in the tank and both females are now guarding broods. The first are almost free swimmers I think, and the second are just now wigglers.
  9. Bilbo

    Bilbo Member 5 Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2008
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I think you have done a great job of setting up this tank as a display tank. It does look great but I agree with Tom that sand works better for in an apisto tank and they seem happier in it too.

    Doesnt the clear PVC tubing get slimy? I found that leaving it under water for any length of time make is go kinda yuk.
  10. Bunnie1978

    Bunnie1978 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2010
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It is slimy. If I had to guess though, it's probably just algae. It certainly doesn't dissolve or anything like that.
  11. Hnownr

    Hnownr New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Nice Tank Bunnie1978!
  12. Tom S

    Tom S New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    A little off topic, but is this something that is required for apistogramma? My pair of Cacatuoides spawned twice in a hollow of a piece of driftwood (ate the eggs both times), then I added a pair of 'Cichlid Stones' which I thought would give them more security and could be moved to another tank easily. They use the stones for shelter, but have not spawned in them. Should I be looking for more of a tunnel then a cave?

    Sorry, new at this.....

    PS. Your tank looks very nice. I hope your make comes out to play soon, mine loves to display at the front of the tank.
  13. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Messages:
    9,817
    Likes Received:
    1,331
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Most apistos live in habitats that don't have stone caves. Instead, they use crevasses in wood or between leaves in the leaf litter. Most prefer openings that are just wide enough to get into.
  14. OHR

    OHR Member 5 Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Some females like to dig themselves in with the fry and closes the entrance in front of her, like the female on the picture number 3 from the top in the first post. This behavior would be easier and safer with fine sand.
    My Wangenflecken female did this every time, probably after the hatching cause she always came out 48 hours later with the fry.

    Ola
  15. briztoon

    briztoon Member 5 Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2008
    Messages:
    203
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Both of my aquarium bred agassizii alenquer female spawned in driftwood nooks. One female in a crevice on a large piece driftwood. The other female spawned under a small piece of concave driftwood, that was under a larger ketapang leaf, and she then built up little walls of fine river gravel all around the driftwood, leaving just one, small opening. There were three small clay pots stashed in the tank as well, further to the back of the tank. I have a wild caught pair of agassizii alenquer in the tank next to the tank bred trio, and the female always spawns in the same clay pot. Go figure?
  16. dw1305

    dw1305 Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2008
    Messages:
    2,128
    Likes Received:
    523
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Hi all,
    Have to agree about the sand, silica sand is definitely the best substrate.

    I've got drift wood, Loquat leaves, plastic pipe, bamboo canes, clay pots and clay saucers in nearly all of the tanks, and at various times they have all been used to spawn in by the females.

    But the cave I like is the 1/2 coconut cave, cheap to buy the coconuts, they are extremely easy to make into caves, you can cut the entrance hole to the size you need, they sink and you can plant them with Java moss or Java Fern.

    [​IMG]

    This is a very old female A. cacatuoides, I've still got her and she is almost 5 now. You can see a plastic pipe at the front right and a clay pot behind it. I originally smeared the plastic pipe with aquarium silicone and rolled it in sand, bark chips and moss, but they have all come off over time.

    cheers Darrel