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Newly described Apisto's from Colombia

a.d.wood

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Notification of the 2 new papers seems to be missing from here so here you go:

Lina M. Mesa Salazar & Carlos A. Lasso. (2011). Apistogramma megaptera (Perciformes: Cichlidae), una nueva especie para la cuenca del Orinoco. Biota Colombiana 12(1): 19-29.

Abstract
We describe a new species, Apistogramma megaptera (Perciformes: Cichlidae) that occurs in the upper Orinoco River Basin, in the Inírida, Atabapo and Mavaca rivers of Venezuela and Colombia.

This species is characterized by a deep body and a sexual dimorphism expressed in the different shape of the dorsal and caudal fins of males and females, as well as color pattern. Other diagnostic features that differentiate it from other species from Orinoco with crossbars on the caudal fin (Apistogramma iniridae, A. velifera and A. inornata) are: anal fin with marginal black stripe; dorsal fin with a thin marginal black line; infraorbital band wide, its width equal to the pupil; these characters are not present in the above mentioned species.

The males reach a larger size (58.7 mm LS) than females (39 mm LS). The pigmentation in the form of crossbars on the tail fin is the character that distinguishes it from other species in the Orinoco River Basin that have immaculate caudal fin (Apistogramma alacrina, A. hoignei, A. hongsloi, A. guttata, A. macmasteri and A. viejita).

Etymology
megaptera > mega (Greek), large, great, strong and ptera (Greek), wings or wing-like structure. In reference to the well developed caudal and dorsal fins of the males.

Paper available here > http://www.humboldt.org.co/publicaciones/uploads/Biota_12(1)_Enero-junio.pdf
____
A quick translate suggest this is possibly what we know as Apistogramma sp. Breitbinden????
____________________________________________
Lina M. Mesa Salazar & Carlos A. Lasso. (2011). III. Revisión del género Apistogramma Regan, 1913 (Perciformes, Cichlidae) en la cuenca del río Orinoco. Serie Editorial Recursos Hidrobiológicos y Pesqueros Continentales de Colombia. Instituto de Investigación de Recursos Biológicos Alexander von Humboldt. Bogotá, D. C., Colombia, 192 pp.

Los peces de la familia Cichlidae, conocidos comúnmente como mojarras, constituyen un grupo de extraordinaria riqueza y diversidad morfológica. Para Colombia se conocen unas 115 especies, sin contar aquellas por describir y que son nuevas para la ciencia. Representan un ítem de gran importancia para la seguridad alimentaria colombiana. Datos recopilados desde la década de los 90 indican que, específicamente para el género Apistogramma, se comercializaron en promedio más de 10.000 individuos al año en el país. Sin embargo y tal como se muestra en el libro que hoy presentamos, muchas de las especies exportadas a mercados internacionales, o bien tenían la identificación errada o lo que es más relevante, correspondían a nuevas especies para la ciencia. Este trabajo nos muestra la inmensa riqueza por descubrir en la Orinoquia y la importancia de la Estrategia Nacional para el Inventario de la Biodiversidad de Colombia.

The fishes of the family Cichlidae, commonly known as cichlids, are a group of extraordinary richness and morphological diversity. For Colombia, some 115 known species, excluding those to be described and are new to science. They represent an item of great importance to food security in Colombia. Data collected from the 90's show, specifically for the genus Apistogramma, were traded on average more than 10,000 individuals annually in the country. However and as shown in the book we present today, many of the species exported to international markets, or had the wrong identification or what is more relevant species were new to science. This work shows the immense wealth discovered in the Orinoco and the importance of the National Strategy for Biodiversity Inventory of Colombia.

New species:

Apistogramma caudomaculata
Apistogramma flabellicauda
Apistogramma intermedia
Apistogramma lineata
Apistogramma minima
Apistogramma nororientalis
Apistogramma pedunculata
Apistogramma piaroa

First of them then (in the order they appear in the review):

Apistogramma piaroa.
piaroa > the name is a reference to the indigenous group Piaroa living on the banks of the Orinoco River in the northwest of Amazonas State in Venezuela, the range of this species.

There is a suggestion in the discussion that this species is the same as that as identified as Breitbinden by Staeck in 2003 and 2008 and as such may now be a junior synonym of Apistogramma megaptera!

Apistogramma flabellicauda
flabellicauda > flabelli from flabellum fan (a large fan used in religious ceremonies) and cauda from caudal/tail fin. A reference to the large fan shape of the caudal fin which bears pigmented crossbars.

Discussion suggests that there are some similarities between this species and Apistogramma lineata

Apistograma lineata
lineata > from the latin for lines, in reference to the longitudinal abdominal lines displayed by this species.

could be superficially confused with Apistogramma iniridae and Apistogramma flabellicauda, however there are well defined characters to distinguish this species along with its restricted distribution of the lower Rio Atabapo

Apistogramma minima
minima > in reference to the small size of this species

Probably what Kullander (1976) identified as Apistogramma sp. 'Tavi'

Apistogramma caudomaculata
caudomaculata > from caudal, tail fin and macula, spot. In reference to the transversely enlarged spot at the base of the caudal fin

This species probably corresponds to that illustrated by Staeck (1991) for species in the Caura River, but here the distribution is extended into the delta Orinoco tributaries of the Serrania de Imataca

Apistogramma intermedia
intermedia > intermediate, in reference to the average size of the species

Could be confused with Apistogramma hoignei but differs in small size and other factors. Also distribution is restricted to Rio Caura and lower Orinoco delta where A. hoignei is absent.

Apistogramma nororientalis
nororientalis > from the French Nord (North) and Latin Orientalis (East), in reference to the distribution of this species.

Species is similar and sympatric with Apistogramma hoignei, distribution however is restricted to North East Venzuela

Apistogramma pedunculata
pedunculata > not sure of the translation here, I think it's a reference to the size of the caudal peduncle in relation to the length of the body and that the caudal peduncle (length??) is larger than normally seen in the genus Apistogramma.

Kullander (1978) ID as Apistogramma cf. hoignei. Staeck (2008) calls it Apistogramma sp. Rio Caura
__________

I know Mike has been looking at these papers as well so hopefully will be able to give some more input as to which of these species we have seen in the hobby already and what we have been calling them.

Andrew
 

Mike Wise

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Andrew, I am working my way through these papers. It's taking time since I'm using a translation program. Nevertheless, this is what 'I think' we have of the species descriptions I've worked on so far:

A. megaptera - it is going to be a problem. The photos in the papers of live specimens are Breitbinden. The description, however, states that the male has extended anterior dorsal fin lappet, the the posterior spines are lower and more even. This does not conform to Breitbinden. The description is that of A. cf. sp. Breitbinden (Kurzlappen)!

A. piaroa - the description conforms to a fish collected in a Mimbon Aquarium expedition to the Río Venturari in 2003 that was listed as "A. sp. Venturari 1" (A. sp. Venturari 2 turned out to be juvenile A. velifera). At the time many enthusiasts believed that Ventuari 1 were juveiles of A. sp. Breitbinden or A. uaupesi. Looking at the only photos of the fish (they were never imported) they show a fish with a distinct caudal spot that is separate from the lateral band. Neither usupesi nor Breitbinden show a distinct caudal spot. Ventuari 1 is a pertensis-group fish. Either this is a new species or the authors have described juveniles of a pertensis-group species, possibly A. velifera. This has happened before. A. parva & A. uaupesi are two such species. We still don't know what an adult 'A. parva' looks like (probably A. cf. agassizii BBCS) and it took more than 15 years to realize that the Rotkeil Apisto were A. uaupesi.

A. lineata - This fish actually does appear to be a new species (close to A. iniridae)

A. minima -The authors say that it is probably the same as A. sp. Tavi, a name Kullander used for some preserved specimens that he has not thoroughly examined. These were collected in 1976 and additional specimens in 2008. Based on the description of the authors, A. minima either is - or extremely closely related to - A. sp. Weißsaum/White-seam. The authors only had preserved specimens so they could not provide life colors, which would be helpful. I hope A. minima is A. sp. Weißsaum, since it will avoids some confusion in the hobby literature. One of the other names used for Weißsaum was A. sp. Minima.

A. pedunculata and A. caudomaculata are both referable to A. sp. Caura and come from Caura's range. I haven't translated the species descriptions yet (nor any of the other), but when I do I'll let everyone know my opinions on the fish and if they are new to the hobby or fish we already know about under some common names.
 

Mike Wise

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Yes, the top 2 photos closely match the description of A. piaroa. A. cf. pertensis (Orangesaum/Orange-seam) and A. sp. Ventuari could very well be the same as A. piaroa. All have been collected from the Ventuari. I think what we need is specimens of A. piaroa from the type locality brought back and photographed in an aquarium. Only then can we know for certain.
 

HaakonH

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About A.megaptera:

Is it likely that this is the same as A166, A.sp."Kurzlappen-Breitbinden"? I'm thinking about that dorsalfin feature, with only the anterior rays being extended an the posterior rays being even - is this feature not also found in A165, A.sp."Windisch"/"Tailspot"/"cf.Breitbinden São Gabriel"? Is the large black blotch on the caudal peduncle mentioned in the description?​
Haakon​
 

Mike Wise

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A. megaptera is not A. cf. sp. Breitbinden (Rio Negro/sp. Windisch/Tailspot/cf. Breitbinden São Gabriel) A 165 (a lot of names for the same species!). A 165 has extended lappets on all of the dorsal spines, like A. sp. Breitbinden A 164. A. megaptera does not have the caudal peduncle blotch seen on A 165. A. megaptere comes from the Colombia/Venezuela (Orinoco system), like A 164, while A 165 comes from the Rio Negro (Brazil).ft

After translating the papers, here are my opinions of the species:


Apistogramma megaptera = A 166 A. cf. sp. Breitbinden (Kurzlappen)

Apistogramma piaroa = A 151 A. cf. pertensis Orangesaum/A. sp. Ventuari 1

Apistogramma flabellicauda = A 156 (Bork photo only); previously considered a form of A. uaupesi

Apistogramma lineata = New species (close to A. iniridae & A. sp. Blutkehl)

Apistogramma minima = A 141 A. sp. Weißsaum/A. sp. Tavi

Apistogramma caudomaculata = “A. hoignei” (Uracoa)? I need to find my slides of this fish to be sure (theywere were collected by ttw in the early 90s while in Venezuela

Apistogramma intermedia = New species close to A. hoignei

Apistogramma nororientalis = New species close to A. hoignei

Apistogramma pedunculata = A. sp. Caura

I believe that several other populations of "A. hoignei" in Colombia will also turn out to be separate species.
 

Mike Wise

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Hmm. It could be A. noroientalis. It shows dark markings similar to this species, but the body shape is different from the type specimens. This could be due to the angle at which the fish was photographed. Do we know where this fish was photographed?
 

HaakonH

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There's no additional information attached to the photo, but I have now asked Mikolji what river the photo was taken in.
 

HaakonH

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Words are in from Mikolji about the location where this photo was taken: "it was taken in a small Morichal in the Anzoategui state of Venezuela." Does this match the description of A.nororientalis?

Haakon
 

Mike Wise

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Yes, A. nororientalis is found in the state of Anzoategui in Venezuela, but so is A. hoignei. These 2 species are very similar. I would need more than 1 or 2 (even very good) photos to separate the species.
 

chch888

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Hi Mike and all,

i am wondering if the following photo is A. megaptera or not.

and while checking the paper of Lasso, it said the caudal fin of A. lineata is rounded, am i wrong? because i used google to translate from Spanish to English.
IMG_3580_.jpg
 

Frank Hättich

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I think the fish is either A. megaptera or, in case it has a caudal spot clearly separated from the lateral band, A. brevis with exceptionally elongated first dorsal spines. A. lineata has a two tipped caudal fin just like A. uaupesi.
 

chch888

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I think the fish is either A. megaptera or, in case it has a caudal spot clearly separated from the lateral band, A. brevis with exceptionally elongated first dorsal spines. A. lineata has a two tipped caudal fin just like A. uaupesi.

thanks Frank. unfortunately, i don't have enough evidence to prove if this fish is A. brevis or not. all three photos show no caudal spot, but maybe just because of the display morph. i have no chance to check the spot under normal condition since it was in my tank at about three years ago.

and now i know the caudal fin shape of A.lineata is similar to A. uaupesi. in the beginning, i thought the caudal fin shape of A.lineata is in round or oval similar to
A. iniridae or A. velifera because of the following description in Lasso's paper in Spanish: "Aleta caudal redondeada, en machos con prolongaciones filamentosas muy cortas en ambos lóbulos."
 

Mike Wise

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This fish looks like A. megaptera. It does not show the anal spot that is diagnostic for A. brevis. Additionally the dorsal fin is different than that of A. brevis, which has very slightly extended dorsal spines 2-4 and more even (agassizii-like), less serrated membranes behind them.

As for the shape of the caudal fin on males of A. lineata, the authors write,

"Aleta caudal redondeada, en machos con prolongaciones filamentosas muy cortas en ambos lóbulos."
English translation: "Caudal fin rounded, males with very short filamentous extensions on both lobes."​

Looking at the photos of the type specimens - and photos of live specimens of A. lineata kindly sent to me by Chris Englezou, who collected them at the type locality, this species does not have a lyretail caudal, like A. uaupesi. Instead, it has a double-tipped caudal more like that seen on A. steindachneri - or some exceptional specimens of A. iniridae, to which A. lineata is closely related.
 

Frank Hättich

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@chch888: sorry for my mistake regarding the caudal fin of A. lineata, I didn't wanted to misinform you. I was sure, but ... I was obviously wrong!

@ Mike: based on Kullander's description of A. brevis, I thought so far that it's not necessarily the case that males have an anal spot. Is this wrong too?
 

chch888

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thanks Frank and Mike.

Hi Mike again,
i would like to show two other pictures, please help me to identify if they are A.lineata.
seems the caudal fin and the lower body stripes are very similar to the description in the paper.
the same fish at different stage.
PICT8729_mb.jpg


PICT9278_mb.jpg
 

Mike Wise

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Well these photos show an iniridae-group species, different from the first (A. megaptera). It does not appear to be A. lineata, however. Your fish has a different pattern in the caudal and a very different pattern on the dorsal fin. It also has a lyrate caudal fin, not a double-tipped caudal. It does show the rows of dots below the lateral band - as do A. sp. Blutkehl/Cutthroat, A. sp. Segelflossen, and even some A. uaupesi, . My guess is that it is one of these species. Do you have any idea where your fish were collected?
 

chch888

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Well these photos show an iniridae-group species, different from the first (A. megaptera). It does not appear to be A. lineata, however. Your fish has a different pattern in the caudal and a very different pattern on the dorsal fin. It also has a lyrate caudal fin, not a double-tipped caudal. It does show the rows of dots below the lateral band - as do A. sp. Blutkehl/Cutthroat, A. sp. Segelflossen, and even some A. uaupesi, . My guess is that it is one of these species. Do you have any idea where your fish were collected?

thaks Mike

this fish was not wild caught, but bred by a south eastern asia farm with name "A.Blutkehl" at about 5 years ago.
but it doesn't looks like A.Blutkehl as the photo of A157 in Datz book.

i would like to ask do you have any photo or related link of real A.lineata? many thanks for all the help.
 

Frank Hättich

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You probably know these pictures (click) of A. flabellicauda and lineata by W. Staeck? However, after what Mike said about the caudal shape of A. lineata I'm no longer sure whether the picture really shows A. lineata.
 

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