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New Fish room

Discussion in 'Aquarium Hardware' started by philip wood, Mar 28, 2019.

  1. philip wood

    philip wood New Member

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    I am sure this topic has been done over and over again but I only ask because I know how technology moves on every year.

    I have built a Garage but solely for the use to have as a fish room, That's why the design of the garage was two walls thick, outside (Breeze Block) middle Cavity with insulation then the Inside wall with the much lighter brick deigned to keep heat in.

    The dimensions are as follows: Length 22ft Width 12ft with a pitched roof but an internal flat ceiling to keep the heat in, Also another internal wall Spanning across the width of the room but with a length of 5ft which will separate the main part of the fish room from the outside door as this will I hope keep condensation down.

    The main rack will have my breeding tanks which are 2ft x1ft x 1ft and I have 30 of these which I want house on one main rack 1ft facing end on so that both the 2ft sides will both be insulated and also the other end of the tanks will be insulated at the back also.

    The other larger tanks will be used for Husbandry and growing on fry on the opposite wall.

    I have had a fish room before (that's where all the tanks have come from) so I am not starting from scratch just want some new idea's about heating a room of this size.

    I look forward to your reply's
  2. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    My fishroom is now 40 years old. I haven't really changed much over this time. The only thing I would probably do to the building is add a vent to reduce humidity, although not a real problem for me. Denver is "high plains semi-arid" and the relative humidity rarely gets above 40%, usually in the 20 - 25% range. It actually helps humidify the house when I open the door for 10 - 15 minutes. I heat the entire room. It is on its own thermostat on the house heating system. I find aquarium heaters a pain and unreliable. For your fishroom I suggest adding a way to vent extra humidity, central heating, a drain in the floor of course (which I don't have - 110 year old house), central air source, and LED lighting. Most of these will save you money in the long term.
  3. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    My fishroom is now 40 years old. I haven't really changed much over this time. The only thing I would probably do to the building is add a vent to reduce humidity, although not a real problem for me. Denver is "high plains semi-arid" and the relative humidity rarely gets above 40%, usually in the 20 - 25% range. It actually helps humidify the house when I open the door for 10 - 15 minutes. I heat the entire room. It is on its own thermostat on the house heating system. I find aquarium heaters a pain and unreliable. For your fishroom I suggest adding a way to vent extra humidity, central heating, a drain in the floor of course (which I don't have - 110 year old house), central air source, and LED lighting. Most of these will save you money in the long term.