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Less aggressive and hard water

Ashenwelt

Member
Messages
39
Hey all,

I am looking for some less aggressive apistogramma for a community tank. Tank mates would include neons, tummy nose and Congo tetras as .

What would you recommend? They need to survive hard water at a ph of 7.

Thanks!

Sent from my SM-N930T using Tapatalk
 

Siggi

Member
Messages
86
Location
Manteigas, Guarda, Portugal
I think you should change your water hardness and acidity before considering to house Apistogrammas. They are softwater fish and should be given soft water to thrive. If your water is hard at pH7, none of the species you mention in the OP will be good.
When you want to have fish - or any other living creature - in your care you must have adequate conditions for it before bringing it to your care. If you live in Singapore or in Florida, you don't get a Polar bear - If you have hard water you shouldn't get Apistogrammas, get guppys...
We must adapt out water to our best knowledge and capability to the need of our fish, not the opposite way around! Soft water fish have their body adapted to a very light load of minerals in their surroundings (=> soft water), from their skin or scales to their enzymes... we can not expect nor demand that they 'adapt' to hard water, because it is not something they can 'adapt' to through their behaviour...

First soften your water - then get the fish you mentioned.
 

Ashenwelt

Member
Messages
39
I think you should change your water hardness and acidity before considering to house Apistogrammas. They are softwater fish and should be given soft water to thrive. If your water is hard at pH7, none of the species you mention in the OP will be good.
When you want to have fish - or any other living creature - in your care you must have adequate conditions for it before bringing it to your care. If you live in Singapore or in Florida, you don't get a Polar bear - If you have hard water you shouldn't get Apistogrammas, get guppys...
We must adapt out water to out best knowledge and capability to the need of our fish, not the opposite way around! Soft water fish have their body adapted to a very light load of certain minerals in their surroundings, from their skin or scales to their enzymes... we can not expect nor demand that they 'adapt' to hard water, because it is not something they can 'adapt' to through their behaviour...

First soften your water - then get the fish you mentioned.
So just a note as op... I didn't post any species, only a family asking for recommendations.

Any reco.mendatioms of softening water? Specifically softening and not PH.

Rob aka Ashenwelt - Back in the aquaria hobby. Always searching...
 

Siggi

Member
Messages
86
Location
Manteigas, Guarda, Portugal
Without knowing you specific parameters, generally speaking, the best way to soften aquarium water in my opinion and experience is to avoid chemicals (drops and/or reagents) and use peat. It's normally sold at small pellets and can easily be put in a 'lady's stocking' inside your filter, sump or tank in a place with good circulation of water.
Chemicals tend to have a short lived effect, after which the previous condition reverts. Peat binds the minerals to it at a molecular level and normally hold on to them - keeps the water soft. When it begins to stain the water brownish it is normally a fairly good indication that it's stopped binding hardness and begun giving out it's tannines to the water, but this is not a mandatory rule...
 

Ashenwelt

Member
Messages
39
Here is the total line up on water quality Ammonia 0, Nitrite 0, Nitratevaries 15, PH around 6.8, KH 40, GH 180. San Diego water, with a touch of RO, lots of plants and some driftwood.
 

Ashenwelt

Member
Messages
39
Oh and more plants will be going in, at least two java ferns (on a couple small pieces of wood Thursday) and hopefully this weekend I will add three or four bunches of anacharis (to block some sight lines).

So peat pellets? Would that still be your primary recommendations?
 

Siggi

Member
Messages
86
Location
Manteigas, Guarda, Portugal
Oops... High GH and low KH. Either you'll have some additives from your water company (most probable being in a dry region) or your water is naturally rich in Mg+ or K+.
It may take an additional week for your water to mature, but adding lots of driftwood or bogwood is good. Boil it before inserting.
There are specialists in water chemistry on the forum, that might give better counselling in this particular area (@darrel ?), but IMO you should wait until your water has released much of its hardening minerals - peat and wood are the best options !
Keep measuring the water and update posts here, please.
 

Ashenwelt

Member
Messages
39
LOL... as I said... San Diego. Desert on the coast. May not need an aquarium heater but the water is creative.

Rob aka Ashenwelt - Back in the aquaria hobby. Always searching...
 

Mike Wise

Moderator
Staff member
5 Year Member
Messages
11,177
Location
Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
I'm guessing that your GH and KH are in ppm. If so that is roughly equivalent to 4.5° dKH and 10° dGH. In this case nearly all clear- and whitewater apisto species will live quite comfortably in your water. Apistos are found over a wide range of tropical South America where the waters vary greatly in hardness, depending on the location. The species I previously listed will even readily breed in it. If they do, you'll find that few fry will survive; not because of the water conditions, but the tetras with them are all efficient fry predators.
 

Siggi

Member
Messages
86
Location
Manteigas, Guarda, Portugal
In the OP you mentioned 'hard water'...
These values wouldn't normally be considered as 'hard' water.
Peat releases beneficial substances, but your parameters are fine for most Apistos :-D
 

Ashenwelt

Member
Messages
39
Well... San Diego is known for hard water lol.

Rob aka Ashenwelt - Back in the aquaria hobby. Always searching...
 

Siggi

Member
Messages
86
Location
Manteigas, Guarda, Portugal
You could try to fill a pan or a pot with tap water, put it on the stove and let the water boil away.
If your pot comes out clean, your water can be soft; if your pot comes out full of white (ish) on the inside - it's almost certainly hard...
An easier solution (but needs equipment) is to measure the conductivity/TDS.
 

Ashenwelt

Member
Messages
39
I get White spots doing that. Maybe the plants and the driftwood are having a good effect?

Rob aka Ashenwelt - Back in the aquaria hobby. Always searching...
 

Siggi

Member
Messages
86
Location
Manteigas, Guarda, Portugal
If you only get isolated white spots, your water might not be so hard after all...
'Hard water' gives you a pot, all white in the bottom.

So...
cycle your filters, get some plants growing, filter a week with peat and I guess you're ready to go.
Some filtering with activated coal is also good, to remove some 'funny stuff' from the water.
 

Ashenwelt

Member
Messages
39
I use purigen recently and have over 20 plants growing in a 45g tank. Do you think charcoal should be added back in the mix?

Rob aka Ashenwelt - Back in the aquaria hobby. Always searching...
 

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