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Dicrossus maculatus - how many females in 17g?

Discussion in 'Other South American Dwarf Cichlids' started by Kravu, Aug 7, 2014.

  1. Kravu

    Kravu New Member

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    Hi,
    I searched like a half of the internet, but I couldn't find, how many females I can keep in my 17g tank(60x30cm base(around 23x12")).
    I'm guessing that 1 male and 3 females will be too much, 1+2 will be ok?

    Thanks for your help.
  2. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    It really depends on how that tank is decorated - and the personalities of each fish. Most hobbyists wouldn't put more than a trio in such a tank. I personally wouldn't put even a pair/trio in such a small tank, but that's me.
  3. gerald

    gerald Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    That's two square feet of bottom area; I think a trio would be OK, with plenty of wood and plants. I have little experience breeding Checkerboards, but females seem less territorial toward each other than Apisto females. Other Dicrossus keepers agree with this?
  4. Mol_PMB

    Mol_PMB Active Member

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    My 6 D.filamentosus are in a 120L tank which has a 2'x15" footprint. I ended up with 5 boys and 1 girl. They are getting quite frisky but no breeding yet. Plenty of challenges between the boys but no physical contact or damage seen yet.
  5. Kravu

    Kravu New Member

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    It's heavily planted(about 70% of the tank or even a little bit more) , with plenty coconut shells and wood, so I think it won't be a problem.

    That's quite interesting, how big are they?
  6. Mol_PMB

    Mol_PMB Active Member

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    The males are now nearly 2" long plus tail, more than twice as big as when I got them in January. I think that's pretty much full size.
    The lone female is smaller. I posted some pics on my Dicrossus thread a week or so back.
  7. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    2" males are not full size unless stunted. I have seen D. maculatus males over 5"/12 cm long, although 3¾"/9 cm is more typical. This species is more robust and aggressive than D. filamentosus. Males can be 'pushy' with the much smaller females not ready to breed. These are reasons I wouldn't use a small breeding tank for this species. For D. filamentosus and D. gladicauda it should be fine.
    Mol_PMB likes this.
  8. Mol_PMB

    Mol_PMB Active Member

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    Here's a link to the recent pics of mine:
    http://www.apistogramma.com/forum/t...sus-sexing-and-advice.17631/page-2#post-88750

    At the moment they seem to be getting a bit frisky, I'm running the pH down at the moment, currently about 5.4. As well as challenges and flaring between the males, I have seen the dominant one dragging leaves around to make a nest.

    They share the tank with some Farlowella twig cats, and the female F.vittata is very fat with eggs at the moment too...

    I'm having a think about whether I can move some fish around to give a pair of the Dicrossus a tank to themselves.
  9. slimbolen99

    slimbolen99 Active Member 5 Year Member

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    I had six in a 48" x 18" footprint, HEAVILY planted tank -- and quickly ended up with just one pair. One very aggressive pair.
    Kravu likes this.
  10. Kravu

    Kravu New Member

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    My local shop raises them from fry(both maculatus and filamentosus) so I guess size wouldn't be a problem.
    But if you don't recommend keeping them in that tank i will probably get D.filamentosus instead.
    How many of them should I get in your opinion?
    Is that tank enough to keep two males(2+2/2+4)?
  11. wethumbs

    wethumbs Active Member 5 Year Member

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    D. maculatus do get big like Mike said. I was breeding them on and off for several years. The males got to around 4"+ in size and females stayed relatively small of around 2" to 2.5". D. filamentosus are much more widely available and I have yet to seen a male grown over 3" in size. D. maculatus male is very aggressive up to point of breeding then the female with the brood care will bully everyone including the males into a corner. So it is best to keep them in pairs if you want to have fry. Otherwise, all you see are fish chasing each others as skittish females will just eat all the wigglers.

    To get a good pair, you will need to invest in buying a group of 6 or so. D. maculatus is much more expensive than D. filamentosus, so it really depends on your budget as well as tank space. D. maculatus will usually start to become sexable around 1.75". As that point the male will 'kick into high gears' and increase in size rapidly.
  12. Kravu

    Kravu New Member

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    In Poland D.maculatus isn't that expensive, and price difference isn't big either(they cost 4$ for maculatus,5$ for filamentosus, juveniles, or about 10$ adult).

    For example, if I buy adults, should I get a group too, or it's only a rule for buying juveniles?
  13. wethumbs

    wethumbs Active Member 5 Year Member

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    Here in the US, D. maculatus is general around 4x the price of filamentosus. If you goal is just to keep and enjoy the fish, then just pick a pair. If you are trying to breed them, you are better off getting a group and once you have a good pair, you can rehome the rest of them.
  14. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    For your tank, I would suggest 1 male and 2, maybe 3, female D. filamentosus. Again it depends on how the tank is decorated.
    Kravu likes this.
  15. Kravu

    Kravu New Member

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    I am very grateful for all your help.
    I was busy recently and looking for dwarfs wasn't a priority, but I found an interesting offer.
    I can buy 1+3 D.gladicauda, however I am afraid that it will be too much to my tank.
    My tank is designed similar to this one, on both sides there are 2-3 halves of coconut,unfortunately they are very close to each other.
    Code:
    http://imgur.com/fcZbu0Q
    What do you think?
  16. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    D. gladicauda is the same size and shape (and species???) as D. filamentosus. If the tank is properly decorated, they should be OK. Don't be disappointed if the gladicauda to turn out to be filamentosus. Every other hobbyist who bought 'D. gladicauda' had their fish develop as D. filamentosus.
  17. Mol_PMB

    Mol_PMB Active Member

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    D.filamentosus are great though. One of mine looks like a gladicauda at the moment, but only because he has had his tail nipped in a fight! ;)
  18. Kravu

    Kravu New Member

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    They were bought as juveniles of D.maculatus but they turned out to be 100% D.gladicauda.
    I posted a link to a tank that looks very similar to mine,on both sides there are 2-3 halves of coconut,and roots are bigger.

    [​IMG]

    All credits for this tank to Wojciech Paul(AquaNL)
  19. merlin

    merlin Member 5 Year Member

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    Have you got photos of the gladicauda