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Dicrossus and apistos

Discussion in 'Other South American Dwarf Cichlids' started by brad, Nov 20, 2006.

  1. brad

    brad New Member 5 Year Member

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    Could a single male (or even a pair) of Dicrossus maculatus or filamentosus live happy with a pair of Cacs in a 40 gallon? The purpose is not neccesarily to breed.

    100% ro water with a ph of 6.5-7.0
  2. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    Yes. They basically will have no problems in a tank this large. Two different genera with slightly different breeding modes. With your conditions, however, I expect them to breed. If the fry survives mostly depends on what other fish are in the tank.
  3. brad

    brad New Member 5 Year Member

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    They could actually breed? I was under the impression, afetr flipping through thekrib.com that I would need to drop my ph to 4.5-5.5.

    Here's the deal so I don't keep repeating the same husbandry questions with different species. I have a few tanks that need filling. MOst of these, to me, are show tanks. I have 2 dedicated fry tanks that have no substrate, just java moss. When I decide to raise a batch of fry, I just steal the eggs. So, as long as the fish can live together, I can get fry. Otherwise, I just enjoy watching the interactions and not expect any fry to live.

    The species I have available to me are:

    Baenchi, Trifasciata, Bitaeniata, Cacs, Borelli, Aggies and Filamentosus.

    I'd like to have 2 species together in my 55, 2 in my 40, and 1 in my 20. I will not play with peat for the 55. It is built into the wall at the entrance and I don't want tea coloured water. The others, I have no problems playing with.

    What combos, if any, would you suggest are the safest bets?
  4. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    D. filamentosus is a blackwater species that needs pH values in the 4.5 to 5.5 range & extremely soft water. D. maculatus will breed at pH<6 in moderately soft water. I was talking about the cockatoos. Your cacatuoides will breed in the water you have.

    I'd put A. borellii & A. trifasciata together. The live together in the wild anyway. Being smaller species, they should do OK in a 20 long. If your 20 gal. tank is a 20 high, I suggest keeping the A. baenschi by themselves in it. In a non-breeding tank, the other species should get along with each other, so it's your choice.
  5. Fatts

    Fatts New Member 5 Year Member

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    Mike,
    Is D. filamentosus actually considered to be a blackwater fish? I got the impression from Romer's atlas that they were not found in blackwater, I think he said it was replaced by D. sp. "Rio Negro". But there is also the long discussion about them migrating with A. elizabethae.
    So can you clearify this one for me?
  6. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    Everyone has a different definition for the water types. Uwe, who spent time in the Rio Negro researching his fish uses Negro blackwater/clearwater biotopes. Here clearwater streams have chemical parameters similar to those of blackwater streams elsewhere in the Amazon, only the water is clear. In the Rio Negro, blackwater streams are extremely acidic and have dark colored water while clearwater streams are very acidic and relatively clear.
  7. Fatts

    Fatts New Member 5 Year Member

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    So his "definition" of clearwater is non-stained blackwater? I thought that everyone assumed clearwater to be more on the neutral side.

    Thanks Mike.
  8. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    Basically, a clearwater stream carries transparent, relatively uncolored water wherever it is located. The water values, however, can vary considerably. The same is true for blackwater & even whitewater.