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Dechlorinating

Discussion in 'Dwarf Cichlid Health' started by Siggi, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. Siggi

    Siggi Member

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    Hi, everyone.
    A simple question.
    Is it possible to de-chlorinate tap water by simple aeration?
    Let me elaborate - if normal tap water is put into a big tank and intensely aerated for several days, will the chlorine be chemically altered into a harmless state?

    Thanks in advance.
  2. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    I think it really depends on how your tap water is chlorinated. Mine, like most other sources in the industrialized world, use chloramines because it lasts longer in the lines. Unless I want to wait several weeks and allow bacteria to eventually break the chlorine/ammonia bond, a dechlorinator is needed. It is inexpensive so why not use it?
  3. Siggi

    Siggi Member

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    Hi, Mike. Thank you for your answer.
    "...a dechlorinator is needed. It is inexpensive so why not use it?" Well, mostly because I'm planning on moving home, and to a somewhat remote town. There I am planning on starting a BIG tank and wanted to know wheather or not I could become independent upon a dechorinator...

    This is all because of water changes (WC).
    My idea was to make a container for water and let it 'mature' for a week with an airstone and then just use it directly for WC.

    Thx
  4. gerald

    gerald Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    Find out what type of chlorine or chloramine the public water system uses. If they use chloramine, I would use a chloramine remover like Prime or similar product to get started. After your water-aging container is set up, you can experiment and see how long it takes for the chloramine and ammonia to disappear on their own. A sponge filter and some organic matter (leaves, wood) will probably help.
    boofeng, ButtNekkid and dw1305 like this.
  5. Siggi

    Siggi Member

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    Ok, once I move in, I'll contact the local water supplyer and ask for a recent report on their additives.
    Right now, during winter, my guess is there is so much water in supply in the mountain, that there possibly isn't much or any desinfectant at all - in the summer, it will be different...
    I'll post here, when i have some numbers.
    Thank you for your help.
  6. boofeng

    boofeng Member

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    How do the sponge filter and organic matter help? Are they good as surface area to support bacteria colonies which break down chloramine? I'm curious because I now pass water through peat in a filter sock (the kind used by reef keepers) for a few days in a reservoir tank before water changes.

    My local water supplier's numbers state the ceiling for chlorine and chloramine is 3 ppm each (our water has both). And so far I've been dosing Seachem Safe, but I wonder if it's actually something I need to do...
  7. gerald

    gerald Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    Chlorine and chloramine are added to the drinking water to oxidize organic matter, such as bacteria and parasites (Giardia, Cryptosporidium). The toxic chlorine is converted to harmless chloride ion in the oxidation process. So you can use leaves, wood, fish food, or any organic matter as a "target" for the chlorine to react with (instead of a dechlorinator product). Ammonia is not destroyed by organics (that's why wastewater is full of ammonia); it needs to be consumed by plants, algae, or nitrifying microbes (bacteria and archaea).

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