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Apistogramma diplotaenia

ste12000

Member
5 Year Member
Just a few pictures to share with Apisto.com members.. I have looked for and wanted Apistogramma diplotaenia for well over 10 years, its been right at the top of my list alongside T.candidi. I was lucky enough to spend 4-5 years with T.candidi in my tanks which just left A.diplotaenia as the fish i wanted to own the most.

Thanks to a BCA member's import from France last month my wish finally came true with 5 young wild specimens. These are slowly maturing and are looking great, they are in with a few young E.lucanusi and A.sp 'Vielfleck' but will soon be given the entire 3ft tank to themselves, with a lower PH and some tannins im hoping to have youngsters shortly..





 

dw1305

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Hi all,
Well done Steve, they look in good condition and I'm sure you will have the magic touch with them.

cheers Darrel
 

wethumbs

Active Member
5 Year Member
Nice, 1st, 3rd, and 5th pics are definitely females, evidence of the orange egg mass 'showing' through. The other two are males. Those are some healthy looking fish.

Here are pictures of my subordinate male and female in brood care. You have to excuse the quality of the pictures since I deliberately lower the resolution to discourage others from 'stealing' my pics. Notice the damage fins of the male caused by his own kind. My other males are much better looking. Males are extremely aggressive towards any fish, not just their own kind. I put the subordinate male into a tank of A. elizabethae, and he became the dominate fish even though he was physically smaller than most of the elizabethae in the tank. You will need to watch for aggression as they get bigger and provide lots of hiding places.



 
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